Ep 2: On cannabis and adaptogens (Part 2)

Melani is a Cosmetic Chemist, and is the Founder of MC2 Industries. In Part 2, we talk cannabis and adaptogens: How does hemp oil benefit our skin, and how can our skin be able to defend against environmental pollutants in our everyday air? Melani Chong’s MC2 blog reveals a peek into what’s to come in the future of beauty and cosmetics.

Part 3: MC2 Beauty, dives deeper into Melani’s formulation process and it comes out tomorrow. See you soon!

If you enjoyed this episode, leave us a comment and email your questions over at hellodoublecow@gmail.com

Ep 2: Our future in beauty (Part 1)

Melani Chong is a cosmetic chemist, and she works with the formulation and development of many beauty products in the market today.

In Part 1, Melani shares current sustainable action being done within the beauty industry, from using food biomass in our products, to having more tech-driven processes like AI (artificial intelligence) to encourage more efficiency in product manufacturing and processing. 

Up next in part 2, cannabis and adaptogens. Tune in again tomorrow.

If you liked this, let us know by sharing or leaving a comment of what you found most interesting.

Questions? email to hellodoublecow@gmail.com

To find better

Why is it that were bought into thinking that we can’t take action to protect our environment, our health and wellbeing?

Maybe our urban cities have been so far removed from a non-wasteful lifestyle that it seems almost impossible to step away from a fast paced culture. That is, we’re speeding on the highway and there’s no sense in hitting the brakes when there’s nobody up ahead.

There’s no help in following everyone else when it doesn’t make sense for you.

On the other hand, there are just over a million things that can help us be more conscious of taking better care of ourselves, our health, and our futures. It just takes a deeper look to find, but there is the alternative.

The alternative is out there, and it’s better, more sustainable, and necessary for all of us.

Design thinkers and current clout

“Design thinking is fluffy” coming from two guys discussing business in a high end co-working office.

I must admit that it generates a lot of excitement and buzz when we use the term design thinking. When asked for it, many who have included it onto their résumé might not explicitly know what design thinking covers.

To clarify, design thinking is a process that is similar to the scientific method. Here’s a broad their of its progressive steps:

  1. Empathize
  2. Define
  3. Ideate
  4. Prototype
  5. Test
  6. Iterate/Implement

Academics in the science community who follow the scientific method don’t qualify themselves as scientific thinkers. It is rather a given that they follow the scientific method as part of their protocol. On the other hand, Design thinking becomes fluffy if the people using the term don’t have an understanding of what it is, and why we have it.

Design thinking is a great thing, and I love everything about the process if it means getting to understand and solve different human problems that contribute to our culture and humanity.

Part 2: passive house design

Continuing from Part 1: Foundations of a Healthy Building, Joel Anderson talks about Passive House Design—a building standard that originated from Saskatchewan, and is now being debated as one of many environmental solutions for energy-efficient housing. Also, the pros and cons of Net Zero buildings.  

Give it a listen below. Better yet, share it with others who might be interested as well.

If you haven’t had a chance to listen to Part 1 from yesterday, head over to The Farm where all the upcoming interviews on sustainability will be.

See you tomorrow for Part 3: Our Current Sustainable Landscape!